I just don’t get it. Other people love their shoes, they spend half their income on them, dedicate a whole room of their house to them. There is even a TV series, Sex in the City, devoted to shoe obsession. To me shoes protect your feet. That’s about it. I object to spending lots of money on them. Why buy shoes when you can buy books? It makes no sense to me.

The thing I really don’t understand is that other people notice your shoes. They say things like “I loved that pair of shoes you were wearing last Thursday” or “you can tell what a man’s like by the shoes he wears.” Um, he has bunions? Ok I might notice if they are brightly coloured or stupidly high but that’s about it. I quite like boots, I suppose, and I used to like Van trainers until my hubby said they make your feet look fat (is that even possible?).  I even bought some for my birthday this year. I have my favourite battered pair of converse, a few evening shoes which only come out for weddings, some uncomfortable ballet flats, running shoes and that’s about it. Needless to say I will not be taking any photos of my shoe collection any time soon.

Luckily for this weeks Gallery post, shoes are big news for the smaller members of the household at the moment. Twin 1 has a bit of a shoe obsession. She has been walking for a couple of months now so I got her first pair of real shoes this week and she seems really proud of them. I didn’t get one of those cute polaroids they take in the shop, as it seemed a little unfair that both twins didn’t have them, Twin 2 being still in cruisers. Also it was at the Clarks outlet – the first weekend in September, the air conditioning wasn’t working on one of the hottest days of the year, so I don’t think anyone was in the mood to get a camera out. “Shoes” is one of Twin 1’s favourite words and she will stop crying if you say it. My mum said tissue to her and she got excited and started pointing to her feet. She likes to bring you shoes, the other day she went and brought her twin sister’s shoes in from the hall one at a time and handed them to her. She was clearly ready to go out.

I’m not surprised her shoes are so important to her. It’s such a special time – learning to walk. It marks the start of their independence, the end of their time as a baby. It also marks the start of a financial drain and trips to the shoe shops – or as I call it – the inner circle of hell.

Maybe one day I will care about shoes. I am sure I will one day look back on these first shoes and really treasure them. Actually I know I will – they cost me thirty pounds. They’re going in a frame.